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 EH60012: Frog Drum

Burmese Karen Frog Drum


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EH60012
Burmese Karen Frog Drum, a fine smaller bronze tribute drum (Heger Type III), Pazi  (Burmese), pam klo’ (Karen) also known as “The Magical Bronze Pond”, the Karen subsiding on slash and burn agriculture were rain dependent, and “rain drums” were beaten to bring on the rains for frogs croak prior to rain and the low frequency drum sounds excite the frogs to croak as well, and thus it was believed that the beating of the drum was a call for rain.

This lost wax casting of a drum is ornamented with 8 frogs with bulging eyes placed in stacks of two at four equidistant points near the edge of the tympanum, the center of which is decorated with a 16 pointed relief “star-of-foam”, having 16 butterfly impressions in the crooks of the star, encircled  by 16 die cast decorated bands in a variety of motifs, which are bordered by raised ripple ridges alternating between triple and double ridges all concentric to the center, these bands starting from the center can be identified as a chain of grain (bands 1, 5,8,11,14) double chains of grain (bands 2,6,9,12,15), ducks (bands 3,9,13), owls (band 4), a complex band of “fish filled birds” in sets of four alternating with 4 quarter sectioned lozenges all interspersed by twos with large rosettes (band 10), the final band without decoration having a braided ridge edge. The sides of the drum are similarly decorated with a mix of triple and double ridges in 3 zones with die cast bands of radial rays, chains of grain, double chains of grain and vegetation, side double strap handles on opposing sides, used to suspend the drum when struck, two unadorned relief “seams” equidistant from the handles. Under one handle a procession near the base of two elephants the first larger then the second.

Dark Variegated verdigris greenish bronze patina, pin holes on the body two repaired areas on the body where the casting was thin, minor surface scratches and discoloration to the sides consistent with age and use, overall fine condition. 
Measuring: 15-1/4 inches high x 21-7/8 inches in diameter.  
Weight: 29.5 lbs.
Mid 19th. Century.
$4600.
 
Ex Collection:
Michel Renard, Malta (purchased in Vientiane, Laos 1961).

Karen Poem:
Rains come when frogs croak
Birds come when rains come
Fish rise when birds come
Floods come when fish rise
Elephants draw when floods come
Timber comes when elephants draw
The land prospers when timber comes.*

*Dr. Richard Morrall Cooler, The Karen Bronze Drums of Burma: The Magic Pond, A Thesis presented to the faculty of the Graduate School of Cornell University in partial fulfillment for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, August 29, 1979.
$4600.00
 
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 TA04188: Frog Drum

Burmese Karen Frog Drum


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TA04188
Burmese Karen Frog Drum, a fine bronze tribute drum (Heger Type III), Pazi  (Burmese), pam klo’ (Karen) also known as “The Magical Bronze Pond”, the Karen subsiding on slash and burn agriculture were rain dependent, and “rain drums” were beaten to bring on the rains for frogs croak prior to rain and the low frequency drum sounds excite the frogs to croak as well, and thus it was believed that the beating of the drum was a call for rain.

This lost wax casting of a drum is ornamented with 8 frogs stacked in twos and placed at four equidistant points on the outer edge of the tympanum, the center of which is decorated with a 12 pointed high relief “star-of-foam”, having 12 die cast butterfly impressions in the crooks of the star, the star points touch the first set of triple ridges which alternate irregularly with double ridges resembling ripples that delineate concentrically the 20 die cast decorated bands in a variety of motifs, starting from the center the designs can be identified as radial rays (bands 1,10,15,18), tiny raindrops (bands 2,3,16,17), continuous lozenge pattern (bands 4,8,14),  a complex pattern of three “fish filled birds”, alternating with three quarter sectioned lozenges having three circular appendages (bands 5,6,11,12), ducks (bands 7,13), thunder pattern (band 9), trellis pattern (band 19) and the outer band (band 20) mostly undecorated having 12 rosettes total ending with a raised braided edge. The sides of the drum are similarly decorated with triple and double ridges in 3 zones with die cast bands in between of chain of grain, radial rays, raindrops, trellis pattern, and vegetation, side double strap handles on opposing sides, used to suspend the drum when struck, two unadorned relief “seams” equidistant from the handles. 

The possibility exists that the original casting of this drum was meant to have stacks of three frogs around the tympanum, now only stacks of two exist. A variegated verdigris light greenish patina due to the probable high copper content of the material along with lime encrustations on the tympanum, one large hole with cracks  on the body under one of the handles, otherwise the overall surface patina is consistent with age and use,  fine condition with some losses. Note: It was customary for the Karen to bury pieces of a drum with the dead, for the drums were also used in funerary rites and it was believed that having a piece of bronze with the dead would protect the afterlife of the deceased. This drum may have had the missing frogs removed during just such a ritual.

Measuring: 18-1/8 inches high x 24-1/8 inches in diameter.  
Weight: 40.5 lbs.
Late 19th. Century.
$6000. 

Karen Poem:
Rains come when frogs croak
Birds come when rains come
Fish rise when birds come
Floods come when fish rise
Elephants draw when floods come
Timber comes when elephants draw
The land prospers when timber comes.*

*Dr. Richard Morrall Cooler, The Karen Bronze Drums of Burma: The Magic Pond, A Thesis presented to the faculty of the Graduate School of Cornell University in partial fulfillment for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, August 29, 1979.
$6000.00
 
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 UH80001: Frog Drum

Burmese Karen Frog Drum


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UH80001
Burmese Karen Frog Drum, a bronze tribute drum (Heger Type III), Pazi  (Burmese), pam klo’ (Karen) also known as “The Magical Bronze Pond”, the Karen subsiding on slash and burn agriculture were rain dependent, and “rain drums” were beaten to bring on the rains for frogs croak prior to rain and the low frequency drum sounds excite the frogs to croak as well, and thus it was believed that the beating of the drum was a call for rain.

This lost wax casting of a drum is ornamented with 8 frogs stacked in twos and placed at four equidistant points on the outer edge of the tympanum, the center of which is decorated with a 12 pointed relief “star-of-foam”, the star points touch the first set of triple ridges resembling ripples that delineate concentrically the 15 die cast decorated bands in a variety of motifs, starting from the center the designs can be identified as radial rays (bands 1,8,12), tiny raindrops (bands 2,6,7,13), trellis pattern (bands 3,14),  a complex pattern of three “fish filled birds”, alternating with three quarter sectioned lozenges (bands 4,9,10), ducks (bands 5,11), and the outer band (band 15) undecorated ending with a raised ridge and a braided edge. The sides of the drum are similarly decorated with sets of triple ridges in 3 zones with 18 die cast bands in between of radial rays, raindrops, trellis pattern, vegetation and waves, side double strap handles on opposing sides, used to suspend the drum when struck, two unadorned relief “seams” equidistant from the handles. Under one handle a braided stalk having a three dimensional procession, of two  elephants followed by three snails.  

The possibility exists that the original casting of this drum was meant to have stacks of three frogs around the tympanum, now only stacks of two exist, in addition it appears that three elephants were intended as well as three snails. Dark variegated verdigris greenish patina. One crack to the edge of tympanum, two frogs without heads, on the body pin holes and thin casting areas, some fortified and 4 cracks emanating from the base, one with some bronze loss, otherwise the overall surface patina is consistent with age and use,  good condition with some losses. Note: It was customary for the Karen to bury pieces of a drum with the dead, for the drums were also used in funerary rites and it was believed that having a piece of bronze with the dead would protect the afterlife of the deceased. This drum may have been consistently modified for balancing out the proportions  in having experienced just such a loss.
Measuring: 17-3/4 inches high x 22-1/8 inches in diameter.  
Weight: 29.5 lbs.
Late 19th. Century.
$4900. 

Ex Collection:
Mike Magerowski, Laurel, MD by descent from John Magerowski, Worcester, MA (purchased in Vientiane, Laos in the years between 1966 and 1970 while in service to the U.S. Department of State)

Karen Poem:
Rains come when frogs croak
Birds come when rains come
Fish rise when birds come
Floods come when fish rise
Elephants draw when floods come
Timber comes when elephants draw
The land prospers when timber comes.*

*Dr. Richard Morrall Cooler, The Karen Bronze Drums of Burma: The Magic Pond, A Thesis presented to the faculty of the Graduate School of Cornell University in partial fulfillment for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, August 29, 1979.
$4900.00
 
(0 reviews)  
 UH80057: Frog Drum

Burmese Karen Frog Drum


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UH80057
Burmese Karen Frog Drum, a small and early bronze tribute drum (Heger Type III), Pazi  (Burmese), pam klo’ (Karen) also known as “The Magical Bronze Pond”, the Karen subsiding on slash and burn agriculture were rain dependent, and “rain drums” were beaten to bring on the rains for frogs croak prior to rain and the low frequency drum sounds excite the frogs to croak as well, and thus it was believed that the beating of the drum was a call for rain.

This lost wax casting of a drum is ornamented with 4 frogs placed at four equidistant points on the tympanum, the center of which is decorated with an 8 pointed relief “star-of-foam”, having 8 butterfly impressions in the crooks of the star and and 25 double circles around the star, surrounded by 14 die cast decorated bands in a variety of motifs, which are bordered by raised ridges alternating in patterns of single ridges and double ridges all concentric to the center, these pond ripples starting from the center can be identified as radial rays (bands 1, 6, 8 and 13), chains of grain (band 2), 35 ducks (band 3), 25 owls (band 4), double chains of grain (bands 5, 9 and 12), mixed bird, fish and rosettes (bands 7, 10 and 11), the final band without decoration having a braided ridge edge. The sides of the drum are similarly decorated with alternating single and double ridges in 3 zones with die cast bands of radial rays, double chains of grain and waves, side double strap handles on opposing sides, used to suspend the drum when struck, two unadorned relief “seams” equidistant from the handles.

Variegated verdigris greenish patina. Coarse casting of the tympanum resembling grit, of which there are some small pin holes on one small section of the outer edge, three repaired areas on the body midsection where the casting was thin, minor surface scratches and discoloration to the sides consistent with age and use, otherwise fine condition. 
Measuring: 12-3/4 inches high x 17-1/4 inches in diameter.  
Weight: 16.5 lbs.
Early 19th. Century.
$3600. 

Ex Collection:
A Massachusetts Private Collection

Karen Poem:
Rains come when frogs croak
Birds come when rains come
Fish rise when birds come
Floods come when fish rise
Elephants draw when floods come
Timber comes when elephants draw
The land prospers when timber comes.*

*Dr. Richard Morrall Cooler, The Karen Bronze Drums of Burma: The Magic Pond, A Thesis presented to the faculty of the Graduate School of Cornell University in partial fulfillment for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, August 29, 1979.

$3600.00
 
(0 reviews)  
 UH80061: Frog Drum

Burmese Karen Frog Drum


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UH80061  
Burmese Karen Frog Drum, a small bronze tribute drum (Heger Type III), Pazi  (Burmese), pam klo’ (Karen) also known as “The Magical Bronze Pond” (Cooler - Terrestrial sequence IV, category A). The Karen subsiding on slash and burn agriculture were rain dependent, and “rain drums” were beaten to bring on the rains for frogs croak prior to rain and the low frequency drum sounds excite the frogs to croak as well, and thus it was believed that the beating of the drum was a call for rain. 

This lost wax casting of a drum in bronze is ornamented with 4 frogs cast at four equidistant points on the tympanum, the center of which is decorated with an 8 pointed relief “star-of-foam”, having 8 butterfly impressions in the crooks of the star, surrounded by 15 die cast decorated bands in a variety of motifs, which are bordered by raised ridges alternating in patterns of single, double and triple ridges, all concentric to the center, these pond ripples starting from the center can be identified as waves (band 1), chain of grain (bands 2, 4, 12), radial rays (bands 3, 8, 13), floating ducks (band 5), two eyed owls (band 6), double chains of grain (bands 7, 9), 2 peaked wing birds, 2 skeletal fish each with a rosette in between (bands 10 and 11), lozenges (band 14), the final band (15) without decoration having a braided plait edge. The broad frogs in relief have bulging eyes and a ridge back with pointed beaks and they straddle the ridges of bands 12 and 15. The sides of the drum are also decorated with multiple ridges in 3 zones dividing die cast bands of lozenges, radial rays, chains of grain, double chains of grain, waves and feathers. The side double strap handles on opposing sides attached with rows of decorative plaiting and additional circular decoration on the spine of each strap. The handles used to suspend the drum when struck. There are 2 mock relief “seams” equidistant from the handles.

Dark bronze patina, with verdigris highlights in the decoration. The tympanum having an edge “chip”, two repaired areas on the body midsection and near the base where the casting was thin, evidence of interior tuning, minor surface wear consistent with age and use, otherwise fine condition. 
Measuring: 14 inches high x 18-5/8 inches in diameter.  
Weight: 20 lbs.
18th. Century.
$3800. 

Ex Collection:
Private Collection, San Diego.

Karen Poem:
Rains come when frogs croak
Birds come when rains come
Fish rise when birds come
Floods come when fish rise
Elephants draw when floods come
Timber comes when elephants draw
The land prospers when timber comes.*

*Dr. Richard Morrall Cooler, The Karen Bronze Drums of Burma: The Magic Pond, A Thesis presented to the faculty of the Graduate School of Cornell University in partial fulfillment for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, August 29, 1979.

$3800.00
 
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 UH80072: Frog Drum

Burmese Karen Frog Drum


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UH80072
Burmese Karen Frog Drum, a fine large bronze tribute drum (Heger Type III), Pazi  (Burmese), pam klo’ (Karen) also known as “The Magical Bronze Pond”(Cooler - Developmental Stage VII, Aerial Sequence, Category C three frogs, p.276)*, the Karen subsiding on slash and burn agriculture were rain dependent, and “rain drums” were beaten to bring on the rains for frogs croak prior to rain and the low frequency drum sounds excite the frogs to croak as well, and thus it was believed that the beating of the drum was a call for rain.

This lost wax casting of a drum is ornamented with 12 frogs stacked in threes located at four equidistant points on the outer edge of the tympanum wherein the bottom frogs straddle the two outer bands. The center of the tympanum is decorated with a crisp 12 pointed relief “star-of-foam”, the star points touch the first set of triple ridges resembling ripples that delineate concentrically the 16 die cast decorated bands in a variety of motifs, starting from the center the designs can be identified as tiny raindrops (bands 1,2,7,9,13,14) radial rays (bands 3,6), chain of grain (bands 4, 10), flying birds in flocks of three alternating with sets of three rhomboid lozenges (bands 5,11,12), skyward looking ducks (band 8),  trellis (band 15) and the outer band undecorated (band 16) ending with one raised ridge and a braided edge. The sides of the drum are similarly decorated with sets of triple ridges in 3 zones with 17 die cast bands in between of radial rays, raindrops, chain of grain and vegetal stalks, side double strap handles on opposing sides, used to suspend the drum when struck, four relief “seams” equidistant from the placement of the frogs. Under one handle along the seam is three dimensional  procession lead down the side of the drum by a large elephant followed by two smaller elephants, followed by three snails. 
Variegated verdigris greenish bronze patina.

Condition: Fine casting overall  with light die cast detail, evidence of interior “tuning”, the body is thin and there is evidence of later fine restorations to possible tears or holes, most of which are under the opposing handle from thehandle with the  procession underneath it, otherwise the overall surface patina is consistent with age and use,  fine condition. 
Measuring: 19-1/2 inches high x 25 inches in diameter.  
Weight: 38.5 lbs.
Late 19th. Century.
$6900.

Provenance:
Private collection, New Jersey.

"The Magic Pond"
Karen Poem:
Rains come when frogs croak
Birds come when rains come
Fish rise when birds come
Floods come when fish rise
Elephants draw when floods come
Timber comes when elephants draw
The land prospers when timber comes.*

*Dr. Richard Morrall Cooler, The Karen Bronze Drums of Burma: The Magic Pond, A Thesis presented to the faculty of the Graduate School of Cornell University in partial fulfillment for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, August 29, 1979.
$6900.00
 
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 UH80171: Bronze Frog Drum

Burmese Karen Frog Drum


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UH80171
Burmese Karen Frog Drum, a fine large bronze tribute drum (Heger Type III), Pazi  (Burmese), pam klo’ (Karen) also known as “The Magical Bronze Pond”(Cooler - Developmental Stage VII, Aerial Sequence, Category C three frogs, p.276)*, the Karen subsiding on slash and burn agriculture were rain dependent, and “rain drums” were beaten to bring on the rains for frogs croak prior to rain and the low frequency drum sounds excite the frogs to croak as well, and thus it was believed that the beating of the drum was a call for rain. This lost wax casting of a drum is ornamented with 12 frogs stacked in threes located at four equidistant points on the outer edge of the tympanum in a counter clockwise direction whereas the bottom frogs straddle the two outer bands. The center of the tympanum is decorated with a crisp 12 pointed relief “star-of-foam”, the star points overlap a ring of rosettes and touch the first set of triple ridges that alternate outward with double ridges, resembling ripples that delineate concentrically the 17 die cast decorated bands in a variety of motifs, starting from the center, the designs can be identified as tiny raindrops (bands 1,3,7,9,15) radial rays (bands 2, 8, 14), continuous lozenge pattern (bands 4, 10, 16), skyward looking ducks (bands 5, 13), flying birds in flocks of three alternating with sets of three rhomboid lozenges (bands 6, 12), a ring of rosettes (band 11) and the outer band undecorated with the exception of a group of three rosettes between each set of frogs (band 17) ending with one raised ridge and a braided edge. The sides of the drum are similarly decorated with sets of triple ridges alternating with double ridges in 3 zones with 19 die cast bands in between of radial rays, raindrops, continuous lozenge pattern and skyward looking ducks, side double strap braided handles on opposing sides, used to suspend the drum when struck, four relief “seams” equidistant from the placement of the frogs. Under one handle along the seam is a three dimensional  procession lead down the side of the drum on a vegetal stalk with curled fronds by a large elephant followed by two smaller elephants, followed by three snail curls decreasing in size headed in the opposite direction.

Verdigris greenish bronze patina indicating a high copper content. Evidence of residue relief bosses from the casting rods. Fine casting overall  with a slightly pitted tympanum surface and light die cast detail, evidence of interior “tuning”, the medium weight body has one pin hole and a minor small one inch tear near one of the seams, no evidence of restorations, otherwise the overall surface patina is even and consistent with age and use, overall fine condition. 
Measuring: 20 inches high x 25 inches in diameter.  (51cm x 63.5cm)
Weight: 45 lbs.
Late 19th Century.
$6400.

"The Magic Pond"
A Karen Poem:
Rains come when frogs croak
Birds come when rains come
Fish rise when birds come
Floods come when fish rise
Elephants draw when floods come
Timber comes when elephants draw
The land prospers when timber comes.*

*Dr. Richard Morrall Cooler, The Karen Bronze Drums of Burma: The Magic Pond, A Thesis presented to the faculty of the Graduate School of Cornell University in partial fulfillment for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, August
29, 1979.
$6400.00
 
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CA90009: 13 German Tobacco Pipes

A Collection of 13 Traditional German Porcelain Tobacco Pipes and a Painting


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CA90009
A Collection of 13 Traditional German Porcelain Tobacco Pipes and a Painting. A compositional long stem pipe having a porcelain bowl called the abguss, a tobacco bowl  oblong in shape and open at the top, capped by a hinged metal lid, narrowing down to a a small tube at the base. This bowl connects with a “U” shaped component either of horn, antler or porcelain then the long stem either carved or turned in wood, horn, antler or celluloid, each segment screwing into one another for easy break down into smaller components, at the stag antler round disk near the top is the buffalo horn mouthpiece attached by a flexible tube cording. Each pipe uniquely composed of different elements. Two of the pipes in this collection are “Reservistenpfeife” an officer’s regimental pipe listing the leader and infantry names. These two pipes list the dates of the regiment, as well. The  Schmatula pipe is dated 1896-98 and the Leining pipe dated 1912-14. Several pipe bowls are decorated with game in multi-coloured transfers or enamels. All pipes are complete and are in excellent condition.
They range in age from the late 19th century to the late 20th century.
The length of each pipe ranges from 5 in. to 38 in.
The largest porcelain abguss is 6 in. x 1-1/2 in. in diameter.
The oil painting of a bearded man smoking a pipe in traditional German hunters costume is on a slice of wood and measures 14-3/4 in. x 6 in. x 1/2 in.
Total wieght: 10 lbs.
$1400. (14 pieces)

Provenance: 
Private Collection, La Jolla, Ca.
$1400.00
 
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CC1080: Jimmu Tenno doll

Japanese Musha Ningyo of Jimmu Tenno


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CC1080
Japanese Musha Ningyo of Jimmu Tenno for the Boy’s Day display, by Maruhei, depicted standing with unusual heavy metal armor and helmet, demon face with glass eyes as a belt buckle, elaborate sword, jeweled necklace with mirror, holding a wood staff with a golden bird on top, well modeled tinted gofun face with inset glass eyes, silk fiber hair and carved beard, fur boots, mounted on a flat wood stand, original box reading: gogatsu ningyo Jimmu Tenno zo Morii shi Maruhei (fifth month doll of Jimmu Tenno owned by the Morii Family, made by Maruhei)
Excellent condition.
Figure: 18 in. High.
Early 20th Century.
$1750.

Provenance:
Ex Carabet Collection, California.

$1750.00
 
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CF60003: Kesi Chair Panel

Chinese Silk Kesi Chair Cover Panel


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CF60003
Chinese Kesi (Silk Tapestry Weave) Chair Cover Panel. Finely woven in bright tones of blue, red, green, orange, and yellow with a gold wrapped thread background depicting auspicious longevity symbols, a large crane with outspread wings perched on layered rock work before a peach tree, over which another crane in flight, all above a quatrefoil panel enclosing a lotus blossom and a smaller pair of cranes confronting a ruyi head issuing from turbulent waves.
Excellent condition.
61-1/4 in. x 20-1/2 in.
Qing Dynasty (1644 - 1912).

Ex-Collection: Sally Fall, San Diego, CA.

For similar examples see:
Sotheby’s London, Important Chinese Art, 11 May 2016, lot 284. ( a near identical pattern with different background colouration, cited as being Ming Dynasty, 17th century)
Christie’s London, Fine Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art including Export Art, 12 May 2009, lot 71.
$6000.00
 
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CY93301: Woodblock Print by Reika Iwami, Water Fantasy A

Woodblock Print by Reika Iwami, Water Fantasy A


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CY93301
Contemporary Japanese woodblock print (Sosaku hanga) by the female artist Reika Iwami (b. 1927, Tokyo) titled “Water Fantasy A”of a setting full moon on the wavy horizon with birds in flight and a Korean wedding duck on a board in the foreground, a black ink and gold leaf on paper, the title in the lower margin with pencil signature, dated ‘83 (1983) and numbered 2/70, Excellent condition.
Measuring 18” x 24-3/8”, framed and glazed 27” x 32-1/2”.
$1200.

For another printing of this image see the collection of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon.
$1200.00
 
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CY93306: Luis Chan Watercolour

Watercolour by Luis Chan


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CY93306
Chinese ink and water colours painted on paper by the artist, Luis Chan (Chen Fushan) 1905-1995, a fantasy landscape depicting islands in a dream blue sea, one barren island formed of human form ghosts inhabited by one isolated fire breathing dinosaur, the other two islands inhabited by animals of varying types with just as varied vegetation. Signed in Chinese and English, dated 1972, and stamped with three artist's seals. Framed and Glazed.
Excellent condition.
Measuring: Painting, 28-1/2 in. high by 54-3/4 in. wide. (72cm x 140cm),  Frame size, 29-1/4 in. x 55-1/2 in. x 2 in. 
$30,000.

Provenance:
with Hanart Gallery, Hong Kong 1987
Private Collection, New York

For similar works from the 1970’s depicting Fantasy Islands see the exhibition publication:
The World of Luis Chan, Chang Tsong-zung, Ministry of Community Development National Museum Republic of Singapore, 1987.
A related work dated 1975: Sotheby’s Hong Kong, Modern Asian Art, 03 October 2016, lot 5051.

Biography from the March 2017 Retrospective of Luis Chan @ Hanart TZ Gallery, Hong Kong:
Luis CHAN (CHEN Fushan) (1905 – 1995)
Luis Chan was an eccentric Hong Kong genius who, as one of the first generation of Chinese modern painters, has become legendary in the history of Chinese contemporary art. The full corpus of Luis Chan’s work in his long artistic life is breathtaking in scope. Chan was born in Panama in 1905 to Cantonese parents, and settled in Hong Kong with his family in 1910. As a landscape painter from the late 1920s to 1960, Chan developed a lively English landscape style and used to go on painting expeditions around Hong Kong, sketching watercolours that captured the rich and varied life of the enclave. By the late 1930s Chan had become known locally as the ‘King of Watercolour’. Together with artists Lee Byng (Li Bing) and Yee Bon (Yu Ben), he was also hailed as one of the ‘Three Masters’ of Hong Kong painting. In the 1950s, Luis Chan abandoned his orthodox style and entered a period of intense experimentation with a wide spectrum of international avant-garde styles, from Abstraction to Pop and Psychedelia. In the late 1960s, Luis Chan underwent dramatic transformations in his visual rhetoric; inspired by the hustle and bustle of Hong Kong life, his landscape fantasies reach into the deep recesses of the subconscious collective mind of the city. This intensely idiosyncratic and creative outburst continued through the 1970s and 80s into a whole range of late paintings that are fantastic and cosmic in scope, with a wild visual logic all their own. Luis Chan was also a widely published art critic and writer, a renowned social figure and a seminal catalyst in Hong Kong's art circle. From his first solo debut exhibition in 1933 until his final show in 1993, Luis Chan presented 47 solo exhibitions over his long career and published countless articles on modern art.

For a detailed documentary on the artist see this Video produced by Hanart TZ, 2017:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qp7dl_RDkQU


From the Sotheby's New York Asia week selling exhibition March 2018:
Luis Chan: The World Comes to Him
“Above all else art has to stimulate the imagination”—Luis Chan, 1984


A painter, teacher, writer, curator, and ardent cultural advocate, Luis Chan (1905-1995) was born in Panama in 1905 and moved to Hong Kong at the age of five. He hardly travelled beyond its shores, but avidly read international art publications, painted constantly and remained a pivotal figure in the development of 20th century Chinese art. Starting with Western-style oils and watercolor, Chan soon developed a diverse repertoire of styles that did not fit within any prescribed genre or movement. His works range from surreal Chinese ink landscapes, fantastical portraits in oil, to graphic Matisse-esque collages and bold abstract experimentations reminiscent of ‘action’ painting.

 This March, Sotheby’s New York will present a selection of works by Luis Chan representing all stages of his artistic output. His artworks intuit the frenzied, dynamic development of modern Hong Kong over six decades, from a sleepy fishing hamlet to the metropolitan city of his late years. At the heart of this exhibition is the constant presence of a man who viewed the world wielding a paintbrush and wonderful joie de vivre.
The Exhibition Catalogue can be seen here: 
http://www.sothebys.com/pdf/2017/N09826/index.html
For a short video see:

http://www.sothebys.com/content/sothebys/en/news-video/videos/2018/02/first-look--the-imaginative-art-of-luis-chan.html

$30000.00
 
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DA00020: Tribal Figurative Carving, Timor

Indonesian Tribal Figurative Carving, Timor


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DA00020
Indonesian Tribal Figurative Carving, Timor. Carved from one piece of hard wood of a tall slender naked man with a cockerel on the top of his head standing on a decorative base, legs and arms well delineated separately with his knees slightly bent and with his hands resting at his erect penis, a long neck and nose, “S” shaped ears.
Minor signs of age, overall fine condition.
23-7/8 in. high x 3/4 inch wide x 1-1/2 in. deep.
7.5 oz. ( 214g.)
Late 20th Century.
$50. 
$50.00
 
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EH50012: Painted Porcelain Snuff Bottle

Painted Porcelain Snuff Bottle


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EH50012
Antique Chinese enameled porcelain snuff bottle, flattened circular form with raised neck everted lip, flat gilt mouth rim, concave base, one side painted with iris, chrysanthemum, two butterflies and two unidentified red seals, the opposing side with the same red seals and a blossoming magnolia with a red crested bird perched upon it emanating from behind a rock with narcissus and chrysanthemums. The underside with an iron-red Gu Yue Xuan (Pavilion of the Ancient Moon) three character hallmark (first used on wares made for the pavilion of this name in the Forbidden City in 1749). Malachite stopper with vermillion stained ivory spoon.
Excellent condition.
6.5cm / 2-3/4in. high.
19th century.
$450.

Ex Collection: Miss C. Margaret Goldney, Ightham, Sevenoaks, Kent. 


$450.00
 
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EH50028: Khmer Ceramic Bird Lime Pot

Khmer bird pot


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EH50028
Khmer squat globular stoneware jarlet in the form of an owl covered in a brown glaze stopping short of the elevated string cut foot displaying the beige biscuit, an owl’s beak and eyes in relief on the shoulder and a relief suggestion of tail feathers on the opposing side, incised concentric rings around the mouth and vertical lines on the body, tail feathers and base chipped, glaze frits otherwise good condition.
2-1/4" High x 3" in Diameter.
12th Century.
$400.

Ex Collection: Miss C. Margaret Goldney, Ightham, Sevenoaks, Kent.

For other examples of Khmer bird pots see:
H. Fujiwara, Khmer ceramics from the Kamratan Collection in the Southeast Asian Ceramics Museum, Kyoto, 1990, pp.74-79.
D.F. Frasche, Southeast Asian Ceramics, 1976. #13.
Oriental Ceramic Society of Hong Kong, South-EastAsian and Chinese Trade Pottery, 1979, p.219.
J.C. Shaw, Introducing Thai Ceramics Also Burmese and Khmer, 1987, p.21.
Prof. Dr. Roger Goepper, Legend and Reality: Early Ceramics from South-East Asia, 1977, #43.
$400.00
 
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EH50030: Khmer Bird Lime Pot

Khmer bird lime pot


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EH50030
Khmer globular stoneware lime jar in the form of an owl covered in a brown glaze stopping short of the elevated string cut foot displaying the beige biscuit, an owl’s beak and eyes in relief on the shoulder and a relief suggestion of tail feathers on the opposing side, incised concentric rings around the mouth.
Minor glaze frits otherwise fine condition.
3-1/2" High x 4-1/2" in Diameter.
1 lb. 6 oz.
12th Century.
$800.

Ex Collection: Miss C. Margaret Goldney, Ightham, Sevenoaks, Kent.
 

For other examples of Khmer bird pots see:
H. Fujiwara, Khmer ceramics from the Kamratan Collection in the Southeast Asian Ceramics Museum, Kyoto, 1990, pp.74-79.
D.F. Frasche, Southeast Asian Ceramics, 1976. #13.
Oriental Ceramic Society of Hong Kong, South-East Asian and Chinese Trade Pottery, 1979, p.219.
J.C. Shaw, Introducing Thai Ceramics Also Burmese and Khmer, 1987, p.21.
Prof. Dr. Roger Goepper, Legend and Reality: Early Ceramics from South-East Asia, 1977, #45a-b.

$800.00
 
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ES80013: Four Suibokuga Kano Tokinobu

Set of Four Antique Japanese Suibokuga by Kano Tokinobu


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ES80013
Set of Four Antique Japanese Suibokuga by Kano Tokinobu, sumi-e ink on paper paintings illustrating an acolyte at a riverbank, two egrets and two landscapes containing buildings, trees and ship masts. Each painting with 3 vermillion seals of the artist in the lower corners. Japanese dry mount paper on a wood frame with thin brocade border, silver leafed surround and lacquered wood outer frame.
Condition: Minor signs of age, wear, stains and repairs otherwise fine condition.
Age: Painting Edo Period, circa 1670. Mounting circa 1985.
Each Image: 51-1/2 in. x 20-1/2 in. (131cm x 52cm) 
Each Mount: 59-1/4 in. x 25-1/4 in. (150cm x 64cm)
Weight: 22 lbs.
$12,000. set of 4

Provenance:
with Honeychurch Antiques, Seattle 1988
Parker & Evelyn Sroufe, Seattle

Kano Tokinobu 狩野時信 (1642-1678)
The artist is the adopted son of Kano Eishin Yasunobu, founder of the Nakabashi Kano line. Worked in Edo: became chief oku eshi to the shogunate.. In 1674 with his father painted some screens for the Shishinden of the Imperial Palace in Kyoto. Because of his early death there are few known works extant. 

For other examples by this artist see: 
Museum of Fine Arts Boston 11.4415 & 11.4416 & 11.6754
British Museum 1881,1210,0.237

$12000.00
 
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KG70010: Koryo Celadon Twin Phoenix Bowl

Koryo celadon twin phoenix bowl


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KG70010
Korean celadon glazed bowl with interior carved design of three phoenixes in flight around the cavetto and a lotus blossom on center, a deep flared form with narrow footed base having three spur marks, covered overall in a crazed and crackled transparent celadon glaze.
Condition: The rim frits and chips restored with silver lacquer, otherwise fine condition.
3 in. high x 6-3/4 in. in diameter.
15 oz.
Koryo period, 13th century.
$3000.

Ex-Collection: Margaret Miller White, Rancho Santa Fe, CA.
$3000.00
 
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NG81015: Bronze Egret Incense Burner

Bronze Egret Incense Burner


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NG81015
Japanese bronze incense burner in the charming cast form of a stylized egret standing on one leg with the left leg extended up and forward, the head held back with the long beak pointing heavenward, fine detail and patina, the body serves as the incense receptacle with detachable wing cover having individual feather and key fret border detail and the main smoke aperture being the mouth, complete with a wood base wired to the bronze for stability.
Fine genuine patina, two of the three wing apertures encrusted, evidence of minor repairs, otherwise fine condition.
10” high.
Weight: 2lbs. 3oz.
Early 20th century.
$2000.

$2000.00
 
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NG81017: Bronze Bird Incense Burner

Bronze Bird Incense Burner


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NG81017
Antique Japanese bronze incense burner, in the form of a bird perched on one foot on a tall rocky outcropping, the bird’s head looking back with open mouth and pierced removable wings revealing the incense chamber, the left foot partially clenched, gilt highlights on the rock and the bird’s head.
Minor signs of wear otherwise excellent condition.
10-1/2 in. high.
19th century.
$4200.

$4200.00
 
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NG84004: Mitate Kofuku Gosho Ningyo

Mitate Kofuku Gosho Ningyo


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NG84004
apanese Kofuku-no-inori gosho ningyo (a good luck wish palace doll) of a plump kneeling male child holding a bird cage in front of him with a bird in the palm of his right hand, traditionally given amongst the nobility as a wish for freedom from the compulsory residence in Edo, all carved of wood covered in multiple layers of burnished gofun with painted features, applied and couched chirimen bib and applied hair, all on a silk and brocade cushion.
Minor surface restorations and cracks on the left arm, otherwise fine condition.
6-5/8 in. high.
Edo Period, circa 1820.
$4500.
$4500.00
 
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NH00022: Bronze Crane censer

Bronze Crane Incense Burner


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NH00022
Japanese bronze incense burner in the unusual form of two cranes on a rocky outcropping each standing with necks outstretched to the heavens, the larger crane with removable wings serving as the censer cover.
Signs of wear and use otherwise fine condition.
18” high x 7 in. x 7 in..
Weight: 4lbs. 2 oz.
Meiji Period, Circa 1900.
$4000. 

$4000.00
 
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UA01019: Tsutsugaki Futonji Phoenix

Tsutsugaki Futonji Phoenix


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UA01019
Japanese paste resist dyed (tsutsugaki) futon cover (futonji) in four panel width with design of a phoenix in a paulownia tree symbolic of producing many children and thus an appropriate design for a new bride’s futon cover, rendered in white reserve with light blue, pinks, and grey tones.
Three preventative back patches over pin-sized holes, otherwise fine condition.
51-1/2 in. high x 52 In. wide
11 oz. (305g.)
Meiji Period,Circa 1890.
$1500.

For similar examples see: 
Kogire-kai 26 January 2006 Tsutsugaki Textiles, pp.54-58, lot #’s 208 - 216.
Sachio Yoshioka, Tsutsugaki Textiles, p. 68.
Fifi White, Japanese Folk Textiles: An American Collection, pp. 96-98, figs. 78 - 80.

$1500.00
 
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UA03141: Zhu Jiyi, Pine & Crane Rubbing Scroll

Chinese Rubbing mounted as a scroll: Longevity Symbols by Zhu Jiyi


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UA03141
Chinese ink rubbing of a stone stele engraving, dating to 1680, mounted as a hanging scroll, a lovely scene of two cranes symbolic of longevity under a pine tree, the writing not translated. Original painting attributed to Zhu Jiyi and converted to a stone stele, where this rubbing was produced.
Minor creases, Scroll mounting in poor condition, partially repaired tear at the top of the scroll mounting otherwise fine condition. Image measuring: 73-1/2” high x 31” wide, Mounting measuring: 85-1/2”high x 39-3/4”wide.
19th century.
$600.

Ex Collection: Frank “Till” & Peggy Durdin, San Diego.

For two other examples of this image see:

The Rubel Chinese Rubbings Collection at the Harvard Fine Arts Library. They give the following descriptive historical reference as: “Rubbing of stele depicting 2 cranes in landscape setting of pine tree, rock, flower (wisteria), lotus and water images. Painting and calligraphy done by Zhu Jiyi. Stele outlines drawn by Zhou Zaifeng; title tablet calligraphy by Feng Xiu. 2 seals of Zhu Jiyi follow the inscription... Script style: in kai shu. Song he tu (Cranes and Pine trees)-- cranes and pine trees have long been Chinese symbols of longevity and good health. A Pair of Cranes symbolizes "Long Marriage", as Cranes mate for life. Rubbing from stele with inscriptions on both sides. On the other side of the stele is "Guan zhong ba jing tu" painting and inscription also by Zhu Jiyi... Original stele is currently in Xi'an bei lin, exhibition room 4. Stele date: Spring of 19th. yr. of Kangxi, Qing Dynasty (1680).”

For yet another example see Chicago’s Field Museum, listed in the Fieldiana Catalog of Chinese Rubbings as #1304 with the following Description: “Sung-ho t’u (Landscape, pinetree, cranes.) Li. Hsi-an. Confucius Temple. Keng-shen cycle year. CHU CHI-I, art. Seal of FENG HSIU. 189 x 79. 244810 Illus.” Note the Field Museum has reproduced their rubbing to a large scale format as exhibited at their museum see the photos and descriptive plates listed here.


$600.00
 
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